What lens is best for me?

     

     

     

    How are you with road signs or movie screens? What about newspapers and labels? If you can see objects nearby with no problems, but reading road signs or making out the writing on the board at school is more difficult, you may be nearsighted. Your eye care professional may refer to the condition as myopia.


    Put simply, your eye is either too long, or your cornea is too curved (relative to the length of your eye). As a result, when light rays enter your eye, they’re bent too much - first by the cornea which acts as an outer lens and then by the actual lens inside your eye. The rays come into focus before they reach the retina - the part of your eye, which acts like a projection screen at the back of the structure. Therefore, instead of bringing images into one single focal point (like the bottom of a V shape) onto the screen, the rays cross (like an X) in front of it. This means they are split and diverging by the time they reach your retina.


    Therefore, that is what causes your blurred vision. The more powerfully your eye bends the light, the more shortsighted (myopic) you are. By contrast, the less your eye bends light, the more long-sighted (hyperopic) you become. Myopia is not a disease, it is an eye disorder, but that does not mean that you have “bad eyes”. It refers to a condition wherein the focusing power of the eye is too high in proportion to the length of the eyeball. This is typically treated with corrective lenses.


    Speak to your eye care professional to learn more.

    TOTAL1™ Sphere

    Stays comfortable for 16 hours and helps you avoid the fluttery, scratchy feeling.

    TOTAL1™ Sphere

    Spherical correction works exactly how it sounds

    In the same way glasses correct your vision, contact lenses use spherical correction to help you see the world around you. It’s the first number in a prescription, often abbreviated as SPH, and it measures how powerful your contacts lenses need to be to correct nearsightedness or farsightedness.

     

    Trouble reading things close up but fine with reading sights at a distance? Does reading a book give you a headache?

    If so, you may be farsighted or have an eye condition known as hyperopia. The size and shape of the eye largely causes farsightedness. If you are farsighted, the cornea is not sufficiently curved or the eye is too short, so the light rays from close objects focus behind, rather than on, the retina when the eye is resting (not actively focusing on something).

    Farsightedness can cause the eyes to exert extra effort to see close up. Symptoms may vary depending on the amount of hyperopia. After viewing nearby objects for an extended period, blurred vision, headaches and eyestrain may occur. Other vision disorders can also contribute to these symptoms.

    Farsightedness isn’t a disease, nor does it mean that you have "bad eyes". It refers to a mismatch in the focusing power of your eyes in comparison to the length of your eyeball. The degree of variation will determine whether you will need corrective lenses.

    Speak to your eye care professional to learn more.

    TOTAL1™ Sphere

    Stays comfortable for 16 hours and helps you avoid the fluttery, scratchy feeling.

    TOTAL1™ Sphere

    Spherical correction works exactly how it sounds

    In the same way glasses correct your vision, contact lenses use spherical correction to help you see the world around you. It’s the first number in a prescription, often abbreviated as SPH, and it measures how powerful your contacts lenses need to be to correct nearsightedness or farsightedness.

     

    When you pick up a menu, do you have to move it away from you in order to see the text? Have you come to the point where your arm isn’t long enough for that trick to work anymore?


    The above scenario is a common telltale symptom of presbyopia. Unfortunately, as we get older, the lenses in our eyes lose some of their elasticity, and with this they lose some of their ability to change focus for different distances. The loss is gradual. Long before we become aware that seeing up close is becoming more difficult, the lenses in our eyes have begun losing their ability to change shape to help focus light rays. Only when the loss of elasticity impairs our vision to a noticeable degree do we recognize change.

     

    Speak to your eye care professional to learn more.

    TOTAL1 Multifocal

    A lens that feels like nothing at all with an optical design for clarity at a wide range of distances.

    Test123

    How do TOTAL1 multifocal contact lenses work?

    Unlike multifocal glasses that require you to look through the bottom part of the lens to read up close, TOTAL1™ multifocal contact lenses blend multiple prescriptions in one lens to allow your eyes to focus on objects at all distances. This Precision Profile Design™ combines a bi-aspheric surface, an adaptive minus power profile, and a centre-near design. This innovative technology allows these lenses to deliver uninterrupted transitions from near to intermediate to distance vision.

     

    This is sometimes also referred to as “simultaneous vision” because your brain learns to automatically select the right focus for what you want to see, so you can seamlessly see both near and far vision at the same time.

     

    ALWAYS READ THE LABEL. FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS FOR USE. IF SYMPTOMS PERSIST, TALK TO YOUR HEALTH PROFESSIONAL.

    ^Based on nearly 90% of wearers agreed with the statement ‘while wearing these lenses I sometimes forget I have them on’ (Perez-Gomez). *High oxygen transmissible lenses, DK/T=156 @ -3.00. Based on published manufacturer- provided Dk and thickness values in: Tyler's Quarterly Soft Contact Lens Parameter Guide. Dec 2020. #Based on laboratory measurements of unworn lenses. ~Professional fees may apply.

     

    References: 1. Perez-Gomez I, Giles T. European survey of contact lens wearers and eye care professionals on satisfaction with a new water gradient daily disposable contact lens. Clinical Optometry. 2014;6:17–23. Sponsored by Alcon. 2. Maissa C, et al. (2014) Evaluation of the Lubricity of DAILIES TOTAL1® Contact Lenses After Wear. American Academy of Optometry. Program 145195. Sponsored by Alcon. 3. Angelini TE et al. Viscoelasticity and mesh-size at the surface of hydrogels characterized with microrheology. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2013; 54:E-abstract 500. 4. Wolffsohn J, Hunt O, Chowdhury A. Objective clinical performance of ‘comfort-enhanced’ daily disposable soft contact lenses. Cont Lens Anterior Eye. 2010;33(2):88-92. 5. Pruitt J, et al. Triple-action moisturisers for increased comfort in daily disposable lenses. Optician. 2007;11:27–28. 6. Thekveli S et al. Structure-property relationship of delefilcon A lenses. Cont Lens Anterior Eye. 2012;35(Supp 1):e14. Sponsored by Alcon. 7. Lemp J, Kern J. Alcon multifocal contact lenses for presbyopia correction. Paper presented at the Canadian Association of Optometrists Congress; June 28-30, 2017; Ottawa, ON. 8. Alcon data on file, 2016. Alcon Multifocal Precision Profile Contact Lens Design. Available on request. 9. Frick, Kevin D., et al. “The global burden of potential productivity loss from uncorrected presbyopia.” Ophthalmology 122.8. 2015;1706-1710. 10. Glasser, Adrian, and Melanie CW Campbell. “Presbyopia and the optical changes in the human crystalline lens with age.” Vision research 38.2 1998;209-230. 11. Myopia Management Guidelines – Infographic. https://www.myopiaprofile.com/management-in-practice Accessed: 10/03/2021. 12. Long-sightedness (hyperopia). https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/long-sightedness-hyperopia Accessed: 10.08.2021